Little Known Black History Fact: Trayvon Martin

The shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin took place five years in Sanford, Fla., igniting a flurry of activism and discussion on race matters in America. The tragic shooting at the hands of volunteer night watchman George Zimmerman and his 2013 acquittal gave birth to the Black Lives Matter movement, along with a renewed focus…

via Little Known Black History Fact: Trayvon Martin — Black America Web

Faces of Our History: Daisy Bates

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Daisy Lee Gatson was born in Huttig, Arkansas on November 11, 1914. Shortly, after giving birth to Daisy’s mother was sexually assaulted & murdered by three white men. He father left shortly after that and Daisy was raised by a family friend.

On her adoptive father’s death bed he gave her advice on her pining anger for the lack of justice for her mother’s death:

“You’re filled with hatred. Hate can destroy you, Daisy. Don’t hate white people just because they’re white. If you hate, make it count for something. Hate the humiliations we are living under in the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the soul of every black man and woman. Hate the insults hurled at us by white scum—and then try to do something about it, or your hate won’t spell a thing.” via Wikipedia

At age 25, Daisy met Lucious Christopher Bates. He was an insurance salesman and experienced journalist. The eventually got moved to Little Rock in 1941. Shortly after married on March 4, 1942.

Daisy and L.C (Lucious) decided to become owners of a newspaper. They called their newspaper Arkansas State Press. It was a weekly paper that was distributed statewide. On May 9, 1941 the first issue was published. The paper was said to a be voice of the Civil Rights movement, long before it the Civil Rights Movement was nationally recognized.

Daisy joined a local NAACP in Little Rock, she was following in the footsteps of her father. She became President of the Arkansas Conference of NAACP branches. She was also the public face integration movement in Little Rock. Daisy was the one who would be with the Little Rock 9 students that were to attend Central High.

Daisy set in place plans to protect these student to get to and from school safely. She made her roll clear and joined many school organizations to make this transition as easy as possible. Also, kept in touch with the parents so they know everything that was going on.

Bates played a significant role advocating and guiding the Little Rock Nine. Her house was the drop off and pick up point for them. Later, her house would become a National Historical Landmark.

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Due to her focus on the Little Rock Crisis Daisy and her husband loss the revenue for their paper which caused them to closed it down in 1959. Her husband passed in 1980. Daisy then decided to revamp the Arkansas State Press in 1984.

The state of Little Rock paid Daisy the highest tribute they could. They open up a elementary school in her name and on 3rd Monday in February Daisy Gatson Bates is an official holiday.

Daisy died on November 4, 1999 at age 84 in Little Rock, Arkansas.

 

Is religion/political views a dating deal breaker? Pt. 2

How serious do you take you religion and political views when it comes to dating? Can they be deal breakers? We aren’t talking about the superficial dating, dating with intent to marriage and having child. Join us for this interesting discussion, our phone lines will open up at 10:15pm (est) so please call in (657) 383-1155.

Of course we will be taking questions via twitter @gft_radio

Also before we kick off the topic of the night we will be honoring some people for Black History Month. So be sure to tune in!

On Black History

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Is religion a dating deal breaker? Pt. 1

Faces of Our History: Bayard Rustin

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Bayard Rustin was born on March 17, 1912 in West Chester, Pennsylvania to Florence Rustin and Archie Hopkins. Bayard was raised by his mother’s parents Julia & Janifer Rustin. His grandmother Julia was a member of the NAACP, Rustin grew up seeing the widely recognized people who were leaders in the NAACP in his home. This is what spark is interesting in racial discrimination.

In September of 1932, Rustin enter a historically black college named Wilberforce University. There he was active in various campus organizations but was expelled 4 years later for organizing a strike.

Shorty after moving to Harlem in 1937, he was involved in the Scottsboro Boys case. Where 9 young black men in Alabama were accused of raping 2 white women on a train in 1931.

In 1947, Bayard and George Houser organized the Journey of Reconciliation. It was the first of the more commonly known “Freedom Rides”. The were fighting again the Supreme Court ruling Morgan v. Commonwealth of Virginia that banned racial discrimination in interstate travels. Rustin was jailed for 22 day for violating the states Jim Crow laws.

In 1956 Rustin went to aid Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. when he started the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He wanted to show Dr. King the tactics he learned while training on nonviolent resistance in India.

Dr. King and Rustin organized the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Rustin’s time was cut short when he resigned after members had learned about his sexual orientation by a fellow member of SCLC. He found himself being shunned by Civil Rights leaders.

Rustin later on went on to fight for gay rights. In the 1980s he became a public advocate for gay and lesbian rights. In 1986, he cane a speech on behalf of the New York State’s Gay Rights Bill, he speech named “The New Ni**gers Are Gay”.

In the new times where getting married for LGBT community is acceptable, back then Bayard has to find a creative way to make their union legal. He adopted his then partner Walter Naegle.

Bayard Rustin died on August 24, 1987 due to a perforated appendix.

He will be remembered for his silent contributions to the Civil Rights movement. His fight for equality for black people and those in the LGBT community.

Here is a clip of him debating Malcolm X.