Black History · Black Lives Matter

Little Known Black History Fact: Trayvon Martin

The shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin took place five years in Sanford, Fla., igniting a flurry of activism and discussion on race matters in America. The tragic shooting at the hands of volunteer night watchman George Zimmerman and his 2013 acquittal gave birth to the Black Lives Matter movement, along with a renewed focus…

via Little Known Black History Fact: Trayvon Martin — Black America Web

GFT RADIO SHOW · opinions · Parenting · women

Sunny’s Ladies Round Table

img_20170222_115427_484

Join Sunny, Quiahna & Neisha Thursday @10pm (est) at the #LadiesRoundTable as we discuss issues from our point of view. Click this link to stream it live: BlogTalkRadio

* Pros & Cons of Child Support
* Getting advice on how to be a single parent.
* Why is everything our fault?
* Self Esteem: Complimenting Other Women
* Dating

This is sure to be a great discussion and feel free to call in (657) 383-1155. Phone lines open up at 10:15pm (est). Also we will be live tweeting @gft_radio G.F.T Radio

Black History · Faces Of Our History

Faces of Our History: Daisy Bates

5549_dbates

Daisy Lee Gatson was born in Huttig, Arkansas on November 11, 1914. Shortly, after giving birth to Daisy’s mother was sexually assaulted & murdered by three white men. He father left shortly after that and Daisy was raised by a family friend.

On her adoptive father’s death bed he gave her advice on her pining anger for the lack of justice for her mother’s death:

“You’re filled with hatred. Hate can destroy you, Daisy. Don’t hate white people just because they’re white. If you hate, make it count for something. Hate the humiliations we are living under in the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the soul of every black man and woman. Hate the insults hurled at us by white scum—and then try to do something about it, or your hate won’t spell a thing.” via Wikipedia

At age 25, Daisy met Lucious Christopher Bates. He was an insurance salesman and experienced journalist. The eventually got moved to Little Rock in 1941. Shortly after married on March 4, 1942.

Daisy and L.C (Lucious) decided to become owners of a newspaper. They called their newspaper Arkansas State Press. It was a weekly paper that was distributed statewide. On May 9, 1941 the first issue was published. The paper was said to a be voice of the Civil Rights movement, long before it the Civil Rights Movement was nationally recognized.

Daisy joined a local NAACP in Little Rock, she was following in the footsteps of her father. She became President of the Arkansas Conference of NAACP branches. She was also the public face integration movement in Little Rock. Daisy was the one who would be with the Little Rock 9 students that were to attend Central High.

Daisy set in place plans to protect these student to get to and from school safely. She made her roll clear and joined many school organizations to make this transition as easy as possible. Also, kept in touch with the parents so they know everything that was going on.

Bates played a significant role advocating and guiding the Little Rock Nine. Her house was the drop off and pick up point for them. Later, her house would become a National Historical Landmark.

7707-little-rock-daisy_bates_house1

Due to her focus on the Little Rock Crisis Daisy and her husband loss the revenue for their paper which caused them to closed it down in 1959. Her husband passed in 1980. Daisy then decided to revamp the Arkansas State Press in 1984.

The state of Little Rock paid Daisy the highest tribute they could. They open up a elementary school in her name and on 3rd Monday in February Daisy Gatson Bates is an official holiday.

Daisy died on November 4, 1999 at age 84 in Little Rock, Arkansas.