Health Awareness: Kidney Disease

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What Is Kidney Disease?

The kidneys are two organs that are the midsection on either side of your spine in the middle of your back, just above the waist. They clean your blood, keep the balance of salt and minerals in your blood, and help control blood pressure.

When your kidneys are damaged, waste products and fluid can build up in your body, causing swelling in your ankles, vomiting, weakness, poor sleep, and shortness of breath. If you don’t treat them, diseased kidneys may eventually stop working completely. Loss of kidney function is a serious and potentially fatal condition.

Kidney disease is a growing problem. More than 20 million Americans may have kidney disease and many more are at risk. Anyone can develop kidney disease, regardless of age or race. The main risk factors for developing kidney disease are:

  • Diabetes,
  • High blood pressure,
  • Cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) disease, and
  • A family history of kidney failure.

World Kidney Day (WKD) is a global health awareness campaign focusing on the importance of the kidneys and reducing the frequency and impact of kidney disease and its associated health problems worldwide. World Kidney Day (WKD) 2nd Thursday in March.

For more information about Kidney Disease and World Kidney day check out these links:

http://www.worldkidneyday.org

http://www.nationalkidneycenter.org/

 

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Health Awareness: Multiple Sclerosis

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What is Multiple Sclerosis (MS)?

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. In multiple sclerosis, damage to the myelin in the central nervous system (CNS) — and to the nerve fibers themselves — interferes with the transmission of nerve signals between the brain and spinal cord and other parts of the body. (Credit: National MS Society)

The cause of MS is still unknown – the progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed.
Symptoms

The most common symptoms are overwhelming fatigue, visual disturbances, altered sensation and difficulties with mobility. The majority of people with MS do not become severely disabled. While it is currently incurable, there are medications that have been shown to “modify” the course of MS by reducing the number of relapses and delaying progression of disability to some degree.

Diagnosing MS can be a challenging process. In early MS, symptoms may be non-specific and suggestive of several disorders of the nervous system. Early symptoms that come and go may be ignored. While no single laboratory test is yet available to prove or rule out MS, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a great help in reaching a definitive diagnosis.

For more information on Multiple Sclerosis check out: www.nationalmssociety.org
(Picture credit: Healthline.com)

Also there is a MS Walk:

Date: Sunday, April 17, 2016

Locations: Veterans Park – 2206 Kuser Rd.

Hamilton, NJ 08690

More details to follow.